‘Don’t coat over the real issue of fitting discs,’ says Brake Engineering

Brake Engineering discs and pads

Braking systems specialist, Brake Engineering has called on the automotive aftermarket not to “coat over the real issues of fitting brake discs.” The company states that training is more important than ever for the independent automotive aftermarket.

The company’s technical & training manager, Brian Newell said that coating a brake disc’s friction surface offers no “performance or environmental benefits,” despite claims from a number of automotive suppliers.

“Coating a disc’s friction surface is purely cosmetic,” Newell said. “As soon as contact is made with the surface, the coating starts to wear away. Coating of the outer edge of the disc is useful in the prevention of rust when discs are stored in a damp environment and for a long period of time.”

Newell added that the issue of coating discs to distinguish their quality has clouded the real need for training. “It’s important that garages look at the training – paid for or free – available to them. Vehicles have changed considerably and so it is essential that installers utilise the information available to them, whether it be technical support or installation advice,” he said.

Brake Engineering is going to great lengths to work with installers on the provision of training, with major announcements to be made in the coming weeks.

For example, the use of copper grease in fitting discs is widely discouraged on vehicles with aluminium parts, but a recent Brake Engineering survey found its use still commonplace among installers.

Recently Brake Engineering added six new part numbers to its brake disc product range, which is one of the most comprehensive R90-compliant ranges available in the automotive aftermarket, providing exceptional performance, life and brake disc compatibility, with the additional comfort factor of reduced noise and judder.

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